February 6th, 2015

Sudan And South Sudan – New HART Visit Report Released

A new report from the Humanitarian Aid Relief Trust (HART) attests to a deteriorating humanitarian and security situation, with civilians continuing to bear the brunt of brutal conflict in both countries. 

The report is based on a recent visit to Sudan and South Sudan, with interviews conducted in rebel-held areas of Blue Nile State (Sudan), in refugee and IDP camps in South Sudan and with representatives of Sudanese civil society in Uganda.

Screen Shot 2015-02-06 at 13.34.33Sudan 

Since conflict broke out in South Kordofan and Blue Nile States in 2011, the Government of Sudan has targeted civilians with aerial bombardment, missile attacks and ground assaults.

These attacks are barely covered in the media and provoke little response from the international community.

The report centres on the voices and testimonies of those living at the heart of this forgotten conflict. Interviewees recounted attacks on their families, homes and communities, and described an urgent need for food, education and healthcare. Their accounts highlight the devastating effect that the conflict is having on the physical, psychological and social wellbeing of the local population.

With conflicts in Sudan and South Sudan now converging, the people of Blue Nile state are finding themselves trapped between two conflicts. Refugees in South Sudan are particularly vulnerable, with one stating that “there is no safety anywhere”.

South Sudan

Fighting between the Government of South Sudan and rebel forces continues, perpetuating the internal displacement of nearly 1.5 million civilians. The report documents the situation faced by one group of displaced persons in Warrap State, many of whom have not yet been reached with any form of humanitarian assistance. One woman, living in a camp with her seven children without shelter, blankets, food assistance or access to education, said: “This pain is the pain of South Sudan as a whole, especially for the women and the children.” 

You can download the report just below. You can also view it on Issu (no download needed) here. Printed and large print copies are available on request from HART. 


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