Baroness Cox receives answers to her written questions on women’s treatment during recent Sudanese arrests

February 14th, 2018

Baroness Cox receives answers to her written questions on women’s treatment during recent Sudanese arrests

Baroness Cox (Crossbench) posed another 4 questions to the Government about recent Sudanese arrests of protesters, specifically the treatment of women. Answers have come from Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon (Conservative Minister of State).

Question 1:

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many women they estimate are currently detained in Sudan following the protests that began on 7 January

Answer 1:

UK Embassy officials are raising our concerns with the Government of Sudan about those detained following recent protests, including at a bilateral meeting on 21 January and through a public statement by EU ambassadors in Sudan on 30 January. While no official statistics are available, we estimate that the detained include around 25 women. We have no information on their health, but are calling on the Government to release all those detained as soon as possible and to ensure that they are not mistreated.

We consider that women’s prisons in Sudan do not meet international standards, but we have seen no evidence of systemic mistreatment among the general prison population. There is considerable evidence that facilities operated by the National Intelligence and Security Services (NISS) do routinely mistreat detainees. However, we understand that none of the women detained following recent protests are being held in NISS facilities. To reduce mistreatment, we strongly urge the Government of Sudan to implement the recommendations of the National Dialogue on the powers of the security services to arrest and detain individuals.

Citation: HL5218

 

Question 2: 

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what representations they have made to the government of Sudan regarding the release of the women who were detained following the protests that began on 7 January.

Answer 2: 

UK Embassy officials are raising our concerns with the Government of Sudan about those detained following recent protests, including at a bilateral meeting on 21 January and through a public statement by EU ambassadors in Sudan on 30 January. While no official statistics are available, we estimate that the detained include around 25 women. We have no information on their health, but are calling on the Government to release all those detained as soon as possible and to ensure that they are not mistreated.

We consider that women’s prisons in Sudan do not meet international standards, but we have seen no evidence of systemic mistreatment among the general prison population. There is considerable evidence that facilities operated by the National Intelligence and Security Services (NISS) do routinely mistreat detainees. However, we understand that none of the women detained following recent protests are being held in NISS facilities. To reduce mistreatment, we strongly urge the Government of Sudan to implement the recommendations of the National Dialogue on the powers of the security services to arrest and detain individuals.

Citation: HL5219

 

Question 3:

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what information they have regarding the frequency of torture and sexual abuse of female detainees in Sudan.

Answer 3: 

UK Embassy officials are raising our concerns with the Government of Sudan about those detained following recent protests, including at a bilateral meeting on 21 January and through a public statement by EU ambassadors in Sudan on 30 January. While no official statistics are available, we estimate that the detained include around 25 women. We have no information on their health, but are calling on the Government to release all those detained as soon as possible and to ensure that they are not mistreated.

We consider that women’s prisons in Sudan do not meet international standards, but we have seen no evidence of systemic mistreatment among the general prison population. There is considerable evidence that facilities operated by the National Intelligence and Security Services (NISS) do routinely mistreat detainees. However, we understand that none of the women detained following recent protests are being held in NISS facilities. To reduce mistreatment, we strongly urge the Government of Sudan to implement the recommendations of the National Dialogue on the powers of the security services to arrest and detain individuals.

Citation: HL5220

 

Question 4:

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they have any information regarding the health of the women detained by the government of Sudan following the protests which began on 7 January; and if not, whether they will request this information in order to assess any violations of human rights which could affect the lifting of sanctions.

Answer 4: 

UK Embassy officials are raising our concerns with the Government of Sudan about those detained following recent protests, including at a bilateral meeting on 21 January and through a public statement by EU ambassadors in Sudan on 30 January. While no official statistics are available, we estimate that the detained include around 25 women. We have no information on their health, but are calling on the Government to release all those detained as soon as possible and to ensure that they are not mistreated.

We consider that women’s prisons in Sudan do not meet international standards, but we have seen no evidence of systemic mistreatment among the general prison population. There is considerable evidence that facilities operated by the National Intelligence and Security Services (NISS) do routinely mistreat detainees. However, we understand that none of the women detained following recent protests are being held in NISS facilities. To reduce mistreatment, we strongly urge the Government of Sudan to implement the recommendations of the National Dialogue on the powers of the security services to arrest and detain individuals.

Citation: HL5221

 

You can see all of Baroness Cox’s questions here


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