Escalating Violence in Nagorno-Karabakh: An Update

April 4th, 2016

Escalating Violence in Nagorno-Karabakh: An Update

On Saturday, April 2nd fighting broke out in the disputed region of Nagorno-Karabakh. According to Al Jazeera, “at least 30 soldiers from both sides have been killed”.

 

An Armenian serviceman of the self-defense army of Nagorno-Karabakh launch artillery toward Azeri forces in the town of Martakert in Nagorno-Karabakh region, which is controlled by separatist Armenians, April 3, 2016. REUTERS/Vahram Baghdasaryan/Photolure

REUTERS/Vahram Baghdasaryan/Photolure. April 3, 2016.

 

Yet, there were also numerous civilian casualties, as Russia Today reported in this video, which documents the experience of “two Nagorno-Karabakh boys, who were injured after shells landed near a school”.

 

 

Known as a ‘frozen conflict’, tensions over the Nagorno-Karabakh region never faded even after the 1994 truce. There have been frequent skirmishes along the border, although intensive fighting has largely been avoided in the last decade.

What triggered this sudden outbreak of violence in Nagorno-Karabakh?

Al Jazeera has broadcasted this expert discussion debating the reasons behind this recent outbreak and “the effect of this renewed tension between Armenia and Azerbaijan”:

 

 

The BBC has referred to these escalations in Nagorno-Karabakh as the “worst clashes in decades”.

According to the New York Times, however,  “Azerbaijan announced on Sunday that it had halted combat operations” in a unilateral ceasefire. Yet, despite claims of a ceasefire, the Armenian News Agency has stated that “Azerbaijan was still attacking with missile artillery systems” as reported by CNN.

 

A house which was damaged during clashes between Armenian and Azeri forces, is seen in the town of Martakert in Nagorno-Karabakh region, which is controlled by separatist Armenians, April 3, 2016. REUTERS/Vahram Baghdasaryan/Photolure

A house which was damaged during clashes between Armenian and Azeri forces, is seen in the town of Martakert in Nagorno-Karabakh region, which is controlled by separatist Armenians, April 3, 2016. REUTERS/Vahram Baghdasaryan/Photolure

To keep up to date with developments in Nagorno-Karabakh, please visit HART’s social media pages and read our News Round Up on Friday.

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